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Course Info

  • Course Number / Code:
  • CMS.930 (Fall 2005) 
  • Course Title:
  • Media Education and the Marketplace 
  • Course Level:
  • Undergraduate 
  • Offered by :
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
    Massachusetts, United States  
  • Department:
  • Foreign Languages and Literatures 
  • Course Instructor(s):
  • Prof. Shigeru Miyagawa
    Mr. Manish Gaudi 
  • Course Introduction:
  •  


  • 21F.034 / CMS.930 Media Education and the Marketplace



    Fall 2005




    Course Highlights


    This course features student papers and presentations in the projects section.


    Course Description


    This instance of "Media, Education, and the Marketplace" focuses on the rise of information and communications technologies (ICTs) during the age of globalization, specifically examining its effect and potential in developing nations across the world. In particular, the class will focus on the following three components:
    • "Media" – ICTs, specifically the dramatic rise in use of the Internet over the past twenty years, have "globalized" the world and created opportunities where very few have been available in the past. We are entering a phase where an individual can significantly improve his or her own economical, political, and social circumstances with just a computer and Internet connection. This course investigate these profound developments through current research and case studies.
    • "Education" – With projects such as MIT's OpenCourseWare, the major players in the world are beginning to understand the true power of ICTs in development. Throughout this class, we examine projects that harness the benefits of ICTs to create positive social change around the world.
    • "Marketplace" – The focus is on the developing regions of the world. Specifically, the term "digital divide" is tossed around in everyday language, but what does it really mean? Is there an international digital divide, a national digital divide, or both? Should we try to bridge this divide, and how have past attempts succeeded and (for the most part) failed? Why? These are all questions that are asked throughout this course.

    This course has a very unique pedagogy, which is discussed in more detail in the syllabus section.



    Special Features




    Technical Requirements


    Special software is required to use some of the files in this course: .xls, .rm.

     

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:
This course content is a redistribution of MIT Open Courses. Access to the course materials is free to all users.






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